On the Arts of Notebooks and Conferencing

I saw a thread on Twitter started by someone asking what the most necessary thing to bring to major overseas conference might be. I found the resulting thread interesting. Some things noted were expected like a converter or running shoes or a copy of the program. Then there were some surprises. One of the most mentioned was stationary, including pens and notebooks. This first reminded me of a colleague who said that the last time she attended this particular conference (last year -2018) she had filled whole notebook. Then, came some mild disagreement (internal). Yes, you certainly need a pen or few and a notebook, but why not get those things at the venue or area as souvenirs?

I also noticed that surprisingly there were not many mentions of things like a novel for fun reading; even if you end up with not lots of downtime planned, you definitely will have some during travel, and quite frankly if you’re not a night-partier/socializer (and I’m really not, not even a little) and you don’t have tv or access to your Netflix etc. (overseas licensing stuff often blocks US streaming US stuff), you’re going to need and want something else to do with a few hours most evenings. There’s also the question of securing technology for phone/data use (at least GPS), and figuring out work/communication strategies for any work related projects or classes currently ongoing.

Back to the notion of The Conference Notebook. I have noticed that a standard size (80-100 pages, college rule) for one conference doesn’t work since I almost always only fill part of it. The problem then becomes what to do with the rest, unless I know I’m planning to make that paper into an article. A small notebook can work, but those are easier to lose on a desk full of books, grading, etc.; notepad freebies from hotel or vendors are often too small or flimsy. Then there’s also the problem of what to do with handouts (still a thing) and keep the relevant one with corresponding notes. Full sized notebooks allow better space for adding inserts. Folders are too easy to lose or get separated from the notebook.

This year I decided to try using the same standard notebook for all 2019 conferences. We’ll see how this goes since there is still to go (MMLA) after 4 down (MLA, CAMWS, Sewanee, Leeds). I have started using it a bit for researching/trying to finish something from last year too. SO far this loose organization seems to be working out.

I’ve also started something similar for teaching. I essentially have color coded my commonly taught classes, and have been using the same pink notebook for Comp 101 for the past few terms, purple for Comp 102, and green for World Lit 1; I’m close to filling that last one. This seems to be a good way for me to keep track of lesson plans and what’s been working, what I’ve tried out, and what might need some changing next (which there will inevitably be).

I remember a similar issue to when I was a college student and didn’t fill a notebook for a class.  If you keep such things (and I have), it’s a waste of paper to stop using a notebook before it’s filled but then again if you’re using the same notebook for 2 different things, it can  get hard to keep track of what’s where.

Back to conferencing advice. I have found that it’s a good idea to try and plan to get to the conference venue at least one afternoon before the conference gets going. This allows you some time to figure out where key locations are, and in most cases recover a little from the strain of long distance travel. It also is potentially the one chance to explore a little bit if you haven’t been to the area before. I have not been to the International Medieval Congress at Leeds before, and that first evening was about my only chance to explore dinner options off campus since most other evenings would be booked with conference activities. I discovered a really good restaurant within walking distance (an Asian place called Fuji Hiro- really good veggie ramen!) as well as two bubble tea shops, two non-chain coffee shops, and the local grocery store where I stocked up on UK junk food not easily available in the US.

I also find that it’s a good idea to know where several of the tea/coffee stations are if you’re at a larger conference like IMC Leeds. That way if one is super busy and you’re on a deadline to get to another session, you can hopefully swing by another station and get your caffeine or water there.

Penultimate-ly, be ready for surprises. These are often good, although there are also the inevitable snags; occasionally one even ends up being the same thing. For example, your dorm building fire alarm going off at 2:30am and again at 4:30am one night/morning is on the one hand highly irritating and disruptive, but on the other hand, it’s an opportunity to meet your building-mates all at once. Good surprises are things like finding out on the final day of the conference there’s a food-stall market on the premises along with the expected medieval performances and demos of things like falconry and armor (complete with people on horses).

Lastly, promise yourself to try at least one new or unusual thing for you. I mentioned earlier that I don’t often attend late evening social events. I found one that sounded interesting and made myself go. It turns out that medieval court and folk dancing is a little more complex than you might think. I was also definitely not the only novice or newbie there, which was nice when we were told to form groups. I still have one of the tunes stuck in my head a few days later, and will not be forgetting the little shoulder shimmy move that looked surprisingly modern.