Reading Motivations

Motivation is important. In order to motivate yourself, you need to know what motivates you. Me, I like challenges, especially if there’s a reward of some sort at the end. Sometimes, competition works too.

It seems like every New Years for the past few, I’ve something in my resolutions about fun reading. First, it was spending more time at it, then it was focusing on books I already had, and most recently (ongoing for 2019) it was to finish the several things that I had started the year before before I started on anything new. I’ve only been half successful with that. There’s one thing I really need to finish that I bought when it came out, started about two years later, and two years after that, haven’t properly finished. But that’s not the point here.

My point is that over the past 2 ½ months, I’ve made a visible dent in my TBR (to-be-read) shelves. Why? Thanks mostly to 3 challenges, one ongoing that I’ve participated in for about four years, and two new.  Two are related. The ongoing previously done challenge is a book review group/website that’s an offshoot of Pajiba, the pop culture site, called “Cannonball Reads“. Basically it’s a challenge to read and review 52 books in a year (or a half-cannonball at 26, or a double at 104). It all started as a way to honor a founding member who passed away from cancer, and to raise money for cancer research. I found out about this from a friend from graduate school, and then enrolled myself after finishing my degree as a way to get back into pleasure reading; those years are the main reason why my TBR shelf was actually shelves. I’d purchased things I really wanted to read, but didn’t have time for at the time, on the assumption I’d eventually have time. The goal setting is not really competitive here; it’s more of a social thing, and a way to raise money for a good cause. This year, I think I finished my 52 earlier than I have in years past. Part of this I’m reasonably sure was thanks to new challenge #1.

I found out from a colleague that the local library system was running a summer reading program, not surprising in itself, that included kids, teens, and (surprisingly) adults. If you signed up, read so many hours between May-June-July, you could exchange your reading log for prizes. For the adults, that meant a clip on reading light for 15 hours, and a tote bag for 25 hours. I am one of those people who will do a ridiculous amount of work for small prizes if the work is something I like or is somehow beneficial (including things like a t-shirt for a 5k race or attend so many fitness classes in a month, etc). I wanted me my tote bag. I got me my tote bag. The funny thing is, that I’m pretty sure I actually underrepresented the hours I spent on each book I worked through for that challenge. In any event, some of the books I read for that were recent releases, but quite a few were things I’d been wanting to get to for a while.

Challenge 2 is new to me in the sense that I’ve not tried doing it before, but it’s been running for a couple of years now I think for Cannonball Reads people, and I’d known about it before. I think the momentum from the library challenge stayed with me long enough and they two challenges did overlap by about a month; I may have double dipped a little. Anyways, basically it’s a Bingo board with various categories that you have to read and review a qualifying book for. It’s not a race or standard Bingo in that whoever fills a line first wins; it’s whoever gets a Bingo gets an entry into a drawing for books stuff (I’m honestly not  sure of the specifics for this year, but that doesn’t really matter anyways), and more lines filled equals more chances. The added challenge here is of course the requirement that the book be reviewed. The reviews are often informal, personal, and usually not that long (350-500 words is average). Since the challenge opened in early July, I’ve been trying to average 2-3 books per week, since once school gets back in session, my free time will probably be more limited. I honestly haven’t been all that strategic about planning what to read next as long as it fits somewhere on the board, and so far I’ve got 1 Bingo and probably 4 other possible full lines halfway done.

Not only have I made a dent in my TBR shelves thanks to these 3 events, to the point where there’s actually room for new books, I’ve rediscovered popular non-fiction, found a new series or two, and picked up some things I may not have otherwise.

So, what’s to be gained from all this? Knowing what motivates you helps you read sometimes. Why does this matter? Classroom tactics. I’ve seen plenty of articles and studies bemoaning how difficult it is to get undergraduate students to actually read things, and how few of them are likely to actually complete something that’s assigned. Granted, personal motivation is different for everyone, and there’s realistic way to ensure that every individual in a class group will want to participate, but as I’m starting to set up for the fall semester (which starts in just over a week), I’m starting to need to strategize. Incentive 1: less homework, but more focused and in-depth homework. Incentive 2: possibly some kind of silly competitive game for part or all of the semester. Incentive 3: trying out more interesting, relevant, and/or recent readings. Incentive 4: trying to match readings to skills and outcomes. Basically, try to have the reading be something that models or is otherwise applicable towards a graded assignment.

As already noted, I’m only now getting around to some of the more specific aspects of planning out the semester’s calendars, so some options aren’t fully realized, and I may come up with more. Suggestions appreciated, and we’ll see how this all turns out.

 

Challenging the Canon

I teach a lot of survey courses, often to non-English majors. Recently the idea came to my attention of the question of accessibility of some less than canonical authors and texts that still might be useful in a literature survey. I have taught a few things that aren’t staples in surveys of global literature and British literature, but Ovid’s Amores, Boethius‘ Consolation of Philosophy, Rabelais’ Gargantua and Pantagruel, and Mankind are all canonical, at least tangentially, in terms of general Western literature. With some extra annotation and lecture framing, these texts are not too hard for a student to look up either for background or for translations or secondary analysis.

I have used Tom Stoppard’s The Real Inspector Hound before as well, and students generally respond well to it, although this is definitely a play where you need to use both the script and a performance. Because it isn’t a classroom standard, it’s less likely that students will have studied it previously, and some students might be more interested because this play is something new to them that they haven’t even heard of. Even Stoppard’s biggest commercial/popular hit, Shakespeare in Love, isn’t as well known to students in a first year introduction to literature class. I know this because I asked, and upon further reflection I figured out that the movie might be slightly older than some of the younger students.

There are some titles, both medieval and popular, that could have some real classroom use, but aren’t always available in accessible forms, which makes them even more likely to remain obscure. For example, the 9th century monk Sedulius Scottus wrote among other things a series of lyrics, some of which would fit nicely into either ancient or medieval traditions. For example, one of his poems (c. 81) is a debate between a rose and a lily. Not only is debate poetry a popular genre around that time, but the poem also explores some themes and images which are common like the symbolism of the two flowers, and the attempt to balance pagan and Christian ideas. The problem is that both the original Latin and the single published translation are not readily available. Neither is freely found online, and in physical book form, three copies of Sedulius Scottus: On Christian Rulers and The Poems and a single copy of Sedulii Scotti Carmina (CCCM 117) exist in the library system for the entire University System of Georgia (which includes places like the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech). There are ways to include a single poem in a syllabus, including doing my own translation, but if students get interested, their options for further exploration are quite limited.

Similarly, something like Walafrid Strabo’s Hortulus, as a botanical treatise, might get students who aren’t planning to be literature majors interested in 9th century poetry. Nursing is a popular major and learning that at one point in history lilies were considered an anti-venom in addition to their literary and cultural symbolism might be a gateway for certain students. A dual language (Latin and English) edition is the same large USG library system exists in only three copies; again, as with the lyrics of Sedulius Scottus, if a student were interested in further investigation, finding the materials to explore that text would be a struggle if their institution did not possess one of these copies. A more determined student might be able to find some additional resources, but often, if the class or assignment doesn’t directly align with the student’s major or career goals, they are less likely to be willing to take the time to seek out further information.

The problem with using something that’s not especially standard as a teaching text is not just that the primary text itself can be difficult to find. The same problem exists when a more modern text is popular, but too recent to have generated much secondary scholarship. I have previously used V.E. Schwab’s Vicious in the same general literature survey as The Real Inspector Hound. I also used novels by Kim Newman (The Secret of Drearcliff Grange School) and Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One. All three novels were reasonably popular (two were best-sellers) and all published within about the past ten years. My reasoning was that these were stories students might be able to get interested in, and that they wouldn’t be able to rely too much on secondary work and online summaries or study guides. Vicious was probably the most successful, and I’ll be using it again, but this time I’ll compare it to how students get on with Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere and Drew Hayes’ The Utterly Uninteresting and Unadventurous Tales of Fred, Vampire Accountant. All of these novels are pretty readily available, although none free should a student want their own copy. It’s my experience with novels like these that tells me that often students aren’t often willing to spend time digging into related but less direct avenues of research if they can’t find something directly on their subject within an hour at most. Of the novelists I’ve listed, only Neil Gaiman has been around long enough, been popular enough, and been viewed as literary enough to have much secondary scholarship published on his work. But the interesting thing is that the university library system doesn’t have much of that scholarship; I had to go to the public library for it. Again, limited access and/or time many students may not be willing to spend.

While student struggles with critical thinking, especially when research might be involved, have long been lamented in various academically-centered media for some time, very little, at least of what I’ve seen, has been able to come up with a particularly useful solution. Getting students more interested and invested in what they’re working with is the best solution I’ve encountered, and sometimes the best way to do that is to use things that aren’t as traditional or even canonical in the classroom or academy. The problem of resources is much larger and one individual instructors don’t have much control over, but we can at least get things started by getting students interested, since demand after all can be a pretty powerful force.

Bodleian Library, Oxford University

Special Collections at the Bodleian

This is the homepage for Special Collections (this designation includes manuscripts). Links include access to digitized versions of the Quarto and Summary Catalogues, the two main catalogues of the medieval manuscript collections.

Online Collections Catalogues

Many of the collections detailed here are well known. The information includes details about the collections in general as well as individual manuscripts.